News

Tabor College Concert Choir set to perform home concert March 30

March 26, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concert Choir is set to perform a home concert at 4:00 p.m. this Sunday, March 30 at the Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church located at 300 Prairie Pointe in Hillsboro, Kan.

The choir, under the direction of Dr. Brad Vogel, professor of choral music, will perform the concert with the theme “I Lift My Voice.”

“The voice is a primary means of communicating our relationship with God, in both song and speech,” Vogel said. “The texts of the songs divide into three modes of communication: praise, prayer and proclamation. Each song is either a setting of scripture or a personal expression of relationship with God.”

The choir’s repertoire spans the gamut of sacred choral music, from Renaissance, Baroque and Classical motets, to contemporary sacred choral music by British, Australian, French and American composers.

A variety of accompaniment instruments will be featured in each concert, including piano, oboe, trumpet and a string quartet. Student instrumental performers include Zach Neumann, Janelle Rust and Megan Wiebe on piano, Benjamin Wiens on oboe, Matthew Wiebe on trumpet, and a string quartet of Ryan Loewen and Cheyenne Derksen on violin, Rachael Wedel on viola and Natalie Wiens on cello.

Noted for the vitality of its singing and clarity of expression, the Concert Choir has been selected to perform for the Kansas Music Educators Association State Convention five times under Vogel’s direction. It has been a guest choir twice on the Wichita State University campus, as well as selected to sing for the inauguration of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback.

Vogel notes the focus of the concert as a “sermon in choral music.”

“The repertoire begins with proclaiming the goodness of God and calling people to respond with praise,” he said. “God’s grace and faithfulness is noted in the songs of prayer, and the final section—a collection of spirituals—proclaim the greatness of God and call us to commitment to Him.”

Lifelong Learning Session for March 28 “Health Boosters: Old-time music, humor and olive oil.”

March 24, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College welcomes Al Schmidt, along with Don and Connie Isaac, on Friday, March 28 for its Lifelong Learning session entitled “Health Boosters: Old-time music, humor and olive oil.” The session begins at 9:45 a.m. in the Wohlgemuth Music Education Center at Tabor College in Hillsboro.

Don and Connie Isaac will show how the “good fat” in olive oil is grown and processed.

The major part of the program will feature Al Schmidt, a behavioral educator for the past five years at Via Christi’s Family Medicine Residency Program in Wichita, Kan. He will share how humor contributes to good health.

Schmidt will also play on a 12 string guitar and Marlene Fast, Director of Alumni for Tabor College, will play keyboard to provide the participants with some nostalgic music.

Schmidt grew up in rural Lehigh, Kan. and is the son of Helen and the late Eldon Schmidt. His education includes a bachelor of arts degree from Tabor College in 1972 and a masters of social work from Kansas University in 1979. He carries the following State of Kansas designations – Licensed Specialist Clinical Social Work (LSCSW) since 1981 and Licensed Clinical Marriage and Family Therapist (LCMFT) since 2000.

Among Schmidt’s favorite passages of scripture is from Proverbs 17:22, “A cheerful heart is good medicine, but a broken spirit dries up the bones.”

Don Isaac grew up on a potato and cotton farm in Shafter, Calif., while Connie spent her earliest years on a raisin farm outside of Reedley, Calif.

Don graduated from Fresno State in 1962 and Kansas State in 1964. Connie graduated from Tabor College in 1963.

From 1966 to 1980, they were both on staff at Pacific College in Fresno Calif. and raised two children.

In 1980, they moved to Hillsboro, Kan. where Don became Chair of the Tabor College Business Department and earned his Ph.D. at Kansas University in Lawrence. During the early 1990s, Connie earned a master of arts degree in church leadership from Eastern Mennonite Seminary in Harrisonburg, Va.

The Isaacs were able to purchase most of Connie’s family farm in Reedley, Calif. during the 1960s and 70s. In 2006, they planted olives on six acres of land. Connie says that in “Marion County, farmers might laugh at that because six acres in Kansas would barely grow pumpkins!”

The presentation will include products made from their olives.

The public is welcome to attend all Lifelong Learning programs and may register at the door. Fees are $4 per session or $15 per semester, or $29 per couple. Attendees may enjoy lunch in the Tabor College cafeteria after the sessions at the discounted price of $4.

For more information, contact Connie Isaac, Director of Lifelong Learning at (620)-947-5964 or conniei@tabor.edu. The semester schedule and a downloadable PDF of the brochure are available at www.tabor.edu/about/lifelong-learning.

Tabor College Theater Department presents Tennessee Williams’ classic

March 24, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Theater Department presents The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. The production will be held April 10, 11 and 12 at 7:00 p.m. and April 13 at 2:00 p.m., in the Lab Theater, located in the lower level of the H.W. Lohrenz Building at 400 S. Jefferson in Hillsboro.

In this classic American family drama, Tom Wingfield revisits memories of a meager life with his mother, Amanda, and sister, Laura, in a small St. Louis apartment. Each of the characters sustains illusions in order to cope with harsh realities of a radically changing world, and Tom is caught between responsibility toward his family and the adventurous life he desires.

Laurel Koerner, director of Theater says this play demonstrates real life struggle.

“The play conveys a young man’s struggle between a sense of responsibility and the pursuit of fulfillment. It deftly expresses the tensions that can exist between parents and young adult children while sharing close confines,” Koerner comments.

“The well-crafted, small-cast play provides a great opportunity to focus on telling the story and telling it well,” says Koerner.

General admission: $6, Students: $4. To reserve your tickets, contact Kaylene Unruh at (620) 947-3121 ext. 1033 or via email at kayleneu@tabor.edu.

“This American classic is often considered Williams’ finest work,” Koerner closes.

Tabor College hosting business seminar on March 27

March 19, 2014

Categories: General News, Adult & Graduate

Tabor College in Wichita is hosting a Chamber of Commerce Business Builder Series seminar titled – The Triple E: Excelling in Employee Engagement – from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 27 at 21st Street and Ridge Road.

This Gallup StrengthsFinder seminar is designed for business people who want to experience more employee engagement in the workplace.

For decades, the Clifton StrengthsFinder has helped people uncover their talents. Many top business executives, managers, salespeople, pastors and teachers have realized the benefits of understanding their personal strengths as they lead their organizations.

According to Gallup StrengthsFinder, people who focus on their strengths every day are six times more likely to be engaged in their jobs. They are more productive both individually and in groups.

This seminar provides the opportunity for you to identify your key strengths, develop strategies for utilizing them and for working with others more effectively.

From this seminar you will learn how to:

  • Maximize talents and strengths
  • Increase employee engagement, value and empowerment
  • Accelerate team building and collaboration

The seminar will be taught by Misty Smithson, Director of Business Services and Lewis Lee, Business Program Director, both from Tabor College in Wichita. Upon completing the seminar registration, you will receive instructions and your individual access code. This code allows you to complete your personal assessment and receive your individualized strengths report.

All attendees should bring the report to the seminar. A group discussion will take place to help you learn how to utilize your personal strengths and apply them in business.

“Tabor College is delighted to host the Wichita business community on our campus for this strengths-based seminar,” said Brett Andrews, Vice President of Tabor College in Wichita. “I believe that the content presented by our faculty will be critical to the successful development of human capital in businesses of all types.”

Registration is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. You must register by March 20th.

The class will be held at Tabor College, 7843 W. 21st Street N, Suite 117, Wichita, Kan. Register Here

This will be an amazing opportunity to engage with other business leaders as you discover your own personal strengths.

For more information about this seminar, contact Karen Bartlett at karenb@tabor.edu or call (316) 729-6333, Ext. 2306.

Human trafficking awareness week at Tabor College April 4-12

March 13, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Social Work Club and other supporters are excited to be joining the fight towards ending human trafficking and bringing awareness to this issue. The week of April 4-12 will be dedicated to human trafficking and its repercussions. All week long there will be events taking place to involve the Tabor College faculty, staff and students.

According to the Kansas Attorney General’s Office, between 2011 and 2012, there were 70 reported cases of human trafficking in the state. In 2012, 1,047 children in Kansas were abused in their own home and 3,198 foster children ran away from home due to sexual abuse.

Tabor College social work program director, Lara Vanderhoof says that, “Students of Tabor College’s Social Work Club developed a focused passion to bring about awareness and change on behalf of those who have been violated. We all have a part to play in ending modern-day slavery.”

Several people from the Set Free Movement will be coming to campus and speaking to students. The Set Free Movement is an organization that encourages holistic freedom and seeks to create new futures for survivors and those vulnerable to modern slavery. This organization was founded to help bring awareness to human trafficking and advocate for those involved.

Tabor College students see why this is an important topic to discuss publicly.

Hannah Holmes, a junior, says, “It’s important to bring awareness to the issue. Here on the campus it’s important for college students to be aware of these issues. Once we have an understanding of these issues we can move toward justice and equality and ending human trafficking.”

Here is a list of events for the week of April 4-12:

  • Friday, April 4 – Christian music concert at the Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church, featuring The Afters and Kyle Sherman. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and concert starts at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at ilivelove.org.
  • Tuesday, April 8 – Chapel speaker for Tabor College students will be Kevin Austin with the Set Free Movement at 11:00 a.m. and 11:40 a.m.
  • Tuesday, April 8 – Human Trafficking Awareness Panel at Tabor’s Chapel in the H.W. Lohrenz building on Tabor’s campus from 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Tabor College Concert Choir Tour travels to northern states March 14-23

March 12, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concert Choir will head north for its annual spring tour, March 14-23. The choir will visit five states during the 10-day tour, performing 11 concerts.

The choir, under the direction of Dr. Brad Vogel, professor of choral music, will perform its concert series with the theme “I Lift My Voice.” “The voice is a primary means of communicating our relationship with God, in both song and speech,” Vogel said. “The texts of the songs divide into three modes of communication: praise, prayer and proclamation. Each song is either a setting of scripture or a personal expression of relationship with God.”

List of concert dates/times/locations include:

  • Friday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. at Henderson MB Church located at 1201 11th Street in Henderson, Neb.
  • Sunday, March 16 at 10:45 a.m. at Grace Bible Church located at 310 S. Broadway in Gettysburg, S.D.
  • Sunday, March 16 at 6:00 p.m. at Bethesda Mennonite Brethren Church located at 1530 Frank Avenue SE in Huron, S.D.
  • Monday, March 17 at 10:25 a.m. at James Valley Christian located at 1550 Dakota Avenue N in Huron, S.D.
  • Monday, March 17 at 3:15 p.m. at Freeman Academy located at 748 South Main Street in Freeman, S.D.
  • Tuesday, March 18 at 7:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church located at 410 Main Street in Onalaska, Wis.
  • Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Community bible Church located at 500 Klein Street in Mt. Lake, Minn.
  • Thursday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m. at Basilica of St. Mary located at 88 North 17th Street in Minneapolis, Minn.
  • Friday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. at Dundee Presbyterian Church located at 5312 Underwood Avenue in Omaha, Neb.
  • Sunday, March 23, 10:15 a.m. at Community Bible Church located at 1304 N. Parker in Olathe, Kan.
  • Sunday, March 23, 4:00 p.m. at Grace Episcopal Church located at 701 SW 8th Ave in Topeka, Kan.

The choir’s repertoire spans the gamut of sacred choral music, from Renaissance, Baroque and Classical motets, to contemporary sacred choral music by British, Australian, French and American composers.

A variety of accompaniment instruments will be featured in each concert, including piano, oboe, trumpet and a string quartet. Student instrumental performers include Zach Neumann, Janelle Rust and Megan Wiebe on piano, Benjamin Wiens on oboe, Matthew Wiebe on trumpet, and a string quartet of Ryan Loewen and Cheyenne Derksen on violin, Rachael Wedel on viola and Natalie Wiens on cello.

Noted for the vitality of its singing and clarity of expression, the Concert Choir has been selected to perform for the Kansas Music Educators Association State Convention five times under Vogel’s direction. It has been a guest choir twice on the Wichita State University campus, as well as selected to sing for the inauguration of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback.

Vogel notes the focus of the concert as a “sermon in choral music.”

“The repertoire begins with proclaiming the goodness of God and calling people to respond with praise,” he said. “God’s grace and faithfulness is noted in the songs of prayer, and the final section—a collection of spirituals—proclaim the greatness of God and call us to commitment to Him.”

Tabor College Women’s Choir set for spring break tour March 16-23

March 12, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concerto Bella Voce Women’s Choir is set to embark on its second annual concert tour during spring break. The women will be traveling to six different churches and schools in four different states, performing a concert with the theme “Lift Thine Eyes.”

List of dates/times/locations are listed below:

  • Sunday, March 16 at 8:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. morning worship services at North Oak Community Church located at 3000 Oak Street in Hays, Kan.
  • Monday, March 17 at 7:00 p.m. at Immaculate Conception Church located at 715 Cabrini Drive in Lafayette, Colo. 80026-2676
  • Tuesday, March 18 at 11:30 a.m. Garden Park Church located at 1720 S. Alcott Street in Denver, Colo.
  • Thursday, March 20 at 8:00 a.m. chapel service at Rapid City Christian School located at 23757 Arena Drive in Rapid City, S.D.
  • Friday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. at Hastings Evangelical Free Church located at 2015 North Saint Joseph Ave. in Hastings, Neb.
  • Sunday, March 23 at 10:45 a.m. at Cornerstone Community Church located at 7620 SW 21st Street in Topeka, Kan.

The choir is under the direction of Janie Brokenicky and accompanied by Deb Huyett of Leonardville, KS. Brokenicky is in her second year as assistant professor of choral music at Tabor College. She is the founder of the Concerto Bella Voce Women’s Choir, plus teaches courses in music theory, sight singing and ear training, plus private voice.

Comprised of 19 women, the group is excited to share their musical talents and love of Jesus Christ with listeners.

‘The theme is centered around the message in Psalm 121 and the program includes the piece ‘Lift Thine Eyes’ from Felix Mendelssohn’s oratorio, Elijah,” says Brokenicky.

“The program also features flute and percussion performed by six students within the group.”

Tabor College students send basketball teams to nationals

March 10, 2014

Categories: General News

Faculty, staff and students gathered outside the Tabor College gymnasium Monday morning for a send-off of the men’s and women’s basketball teams. Both teams are heading to the NAIA Division II National Basketball Tournament this week and will play on Thursday afternoon.

The Tabor College women’s basketball team will be playing Northwestern College from Orange City, Iowa in the first round in Sioux City, Iowa Thursday March 13 at 1:45 p.m.

Getting the chance to see his team play in the national tournament is pretty special for Women’s Head Coach Shawn Reed.

“It means everything,” said Reed. “This is what you practice for and you play for is to be able to go to the national tournament, represent your school and your conference. It’s really exciting for us, we’re thrilled.

“It’s a culmination of a lot of hard work on behalf of our players so it means a lot and our fans mean a lot too,” added Reed.

Tabor College received the number 8 seed in the bracket and the Lady Jays bring a 21-10 overall record to the NAIA Championship Tournament. On Monday night, March 3, the Lady Jays won the KCAC Championship at Hartman Arena with a commanding 85-51 victory over Southwestern College, who was ranked #8 in the nation at the time.

The number 1 seeded Red Raiders come into the tournament with an overall record of 27-4. Northwestern won its fourth GPAC Conference Championship with an 83-71 victory over Morningside.

The Tabor College men’s basketball team will play Indiana University (IU) Southeast from New Albany, Ind. on Thursday March 13 in Point Lookout, Mo. at 5:45 p.m.

It’s a dream come true for Men’s Head Coach Micah Ratzlaff.

“It’s something I’ve been waiting on for seven years,” said Ratzlaff. “I wish it would’ve happened earlier, but now it doesn’t even matter because it’s here. I’m really happy that my guys get to experience what I’ve been talking about, what Coach (Anthony) Monson’s been talking about because we’ve both been there as players, so to experience this as a coach is unbelievable.”

The Bluejays are coming off a 97-90 overtime victory over Sterling College in the KCAC Championship game Monday night, March 3 at Hartman Arena in Park City, Kan. Tabor has a 20-12 overall record going into the national tournament.

IU Southeast lost to Cincinnati Christian in the KIAC Championship game 83-71. The Grenadiers come into the tournament with a 25-4 overall-record.

Tabor College students attend international chemistry conference

March 10, 2014

Categories: General News

Dr. Norman Schmidt, Tabor College Professor of Chemistry, attended The Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (Pittcon) hosted March 2 – 6, 2014 at the McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill. Dr. Schmidt was accompanied by his research group of five Tabor science students, whom all presented posters at the conference. Poster presenters were; Tyler Dort (Senior), Kristen Harris (Senior), Diane Krehbiel (Junior), Amy Maphet (Senior), and Zachary Willems (Junior). Students have logged numerous hours in the instrumental laboratory performing research on a number of diverse chemistry projects.

The purpose of this trip was to expose the students to the latest in scientific research and to gain experience in presenting their own research to others. Approximately 15,000 people attended this conference; most of whom are research chemists, while some work in academia or chemistry related fields.

“This conference exposes students to the latest trends in the science field,” said Schmidt. “The students get experience in presenting their own research to others. From this they get new ideas for future research and learn more about how to conduct research themselves. Students get to interact with students from other schools and see how other schools conduct teaching and research.”

This conference draws people from all over the world.

“One thing that the students commented on was the international flavor of the conference,” added Schmidt. “Probably one-third of the attendees were from outside of the United States. This helps them realize that science is not limited to only the United States.”

The students enjoyed getting the opportunity to present their work to an international audience.

“It is great to collaborate with others who have researched similar projects to share ideas and help take the project to the next level,” said Kristen Harris, who presented her research about garlic and garlic vapors. “I had chemistry enthusiasts from Sweden, Germany, Nigeria, California, Illinois and many others from the United States approach me asking questions about my garlic chemistry project.”

The students attending this conference said it was beneficial for them in many different ways.

“The benefit of going as a student is the preparation for public speaking,” said Diane Krehbiel, who presented her research on essential oil in pine tree leaves. “It was initially difficult to explain your research project to complete strangers, but as the night went on, you became more comfortable and confident when talking to others.”

Tyler Dort, who also presented research on essential oil concentration in leaves and in the fruit of the Osage Orange tree, added, “This important to go to Pittcon because it presents an excellent opportunity to showcase the research we have been working on for several years to a large scientific audience. We benefit greatly from this type of atmosphere because it gives us practical experience in the field, as well as exposing us to a larger scientific community outside of Hillsboro that gives helpful feedback. We gain a greater understanding of the importance of advancements in the field of science and the extremely difficult, but necessary process of approving new technologies.”

A conference like this prepares students for their future.

“Pittcon certainly gives us practical experience for the workplace, as it allows us to interact with great minds in the field and take advice from such individuals, as well as becoming familiar with presenting research and the critiquing process,” added Dort.

For students from Tabor College to get this type of experience and exposure is huge.

“In visiting with professors from other schools, I again realize how blessed Tabor College is to have the chemical instrumentation which we have,” said Schmidt. “Without it, this research would not be possible. Many other schools our size do not have such equipment and consequently the students do not have the experience working with it and are not as prepared for post-graduate work as are the students here at Tabor College.”

Life lessons outside of a chemistry laboratory make a student’s college experience that much more meaningful.

“I hope that the experience motivates students to become even more excited about science and share that feeling with others,” added Schmidt. “Science is not dull and boring. Science is exciting and is all around you. Too often today students avoid science and math because it is hard. Science may not be easy, but it is fun. Also, science and math majors generally have very little trouble finding jobs once they graduate.”

The following Titles were presented:

GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY DETERMINATION OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE LEAVES AND FRUIT OF OSAGE ORANGE (Maclura pomifera)
Tyler R. Dort and Norman E. Schmidt

ANALYSIS OF GARLIC (Allium sativum) AND ELEPHANT GARLIC (Allium ampeloprasum) VAPORS WITH SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY
Kristen L. Harris and Norman E. Schmidt

GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY DETERMINATION OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL CONCENTRATIONS IN PINE TREE LEAVES (Pinus ponderosa)
Diane J. Krehbiel and Norman E. Schmidt

GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY DETERMINATION OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL CONCENTRATIONS IN CEDAR TREES LEAVES (Juniperus virginiana) IN A DROUGHT YEAR AND A “NORMAL” YEAR
Amy Jo Maphet and Norman E. Schmidt

SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY ANALYSIS OF ONION (Allium cepa) VAPORS TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN ONION CULTIVARS
Zachary M. Willems and Norman E. Schmidt

Next year, Pittcon will be hosted in New Orleans and Schmidt is working with students that he hopes to take there.

Holy Land Trip Planned for Tabor College Students in 2015

March 05, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College is again sponsoring a trip to the Holy Land January 2-23, 2015. The trip will be led by Tabor Bible professor Dr. Douglas Miller.

Those traveling to the Holy Land will get to tour a variety of historical places. Travelers will visit two dozen biblical sites, including Jerusalem, Nazareth, Bethlehem, the Jordan River, the Sea of Galilee, Jericho, ancient ruins, the Dead Sea and Dead Sea Scrolls, Masada, Mt. Nebo, Petra, plus museums and much more.

“We will have personal contact and conversation with a variety of local people,” says Miller, who particularly noted Palestinian Christians as a neglected minority.

The trip has four primary goals that intertwine daily on the three-week trip. Travelers will be able to better understand the Bible in its context, learn about the three major religions of the area (Judaism, Islam, Eastern Christianity), learn about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, plus find specific times dedicated for worship, reflection and prayer.

“The Holy Land trip during the January interterm was very educational and the most awesome trip one can take,” said Bob Ewert, who took this trip in January of 2011 with his wife Lynette.

“We would highly recommend it to anyone. The multi-generational group was a special part of the experience. The Bible is much more alive today for having been part of that trip,” added Bob.

Keith and Judy Harder had a similar experience in 2009. “The Jerusalem trip was a beautiful blend of biblical archeology, history, contemporary politics, worship and spiritual inspiration,” said Judy. “The trip is well planned and expertly guided.”

Miller noted that the accommodations along the way are very good. Lodging is comfortable (private rooms) and the food is excellent. Most travel is by tour bus, but there is also moderate walking.

There is currently room for additional people to go on this trip. If interested, please contact Dr. Douglas Miller at (620)-947-2439 or via email at dougm@tabor.edu. The cost is approximately $4,500 per person. A deposit of $500 will reserve your spot on the trip.

Previous Next